Leadership & Management

Can A Leader Be Transparent?

Over the course of the last 8 months, we’ve surveyed over 400 managers. These are some of the questions they posed to us in an intimate setting.

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The road to being understood is paved with misunderstandings. But with patience, anyone can overcome it.

Can a leader say, “I care about you but your mental well-being interfering with your performance is irrelevant?”

Reality: We are hired to do a job and while I care about your well-being, I cannot put your needs above the teams’.

Can a leader say, “I believe in you but your inability to make your peers comfortable is what is keeping you from your dream promotion?”

Reality: I may not be the best leader, but I want what is best for you. Leading without being a leader is a surefire way to lose.

Can a leader say, “you are not a great fit for this team nor for our organization. I’m sorry we hired you but let me help you find a better fit?”

Reality: Hiring is often a crapshoot; often we get it wrong.

Can a leader say, “I don’t have all the answers. I, too, want to work from home but our team has been drafted to come into the office?”

Reality: I’m human and an employee, too. I have orders to follow, too. I’ve accepted it and you should too.

Sociologists have examined that in many relationships people fight hard to be understood and often silence others. Said another way, while they fight to be understood, they disregard their responsibility to understand.

Patience and resolve are necessary tenants for managers and employees to accept in the lifelong journey of building more empathetic organizations. While the dialogue may at first be uncomfortable, either party will eventually gain comfort in understanding the other party's perspective.

unboXt’s mission is to enable a world where leaders feel comfortable being transparent and thoughtful in their interactions with their teams. While this is taking place, employees will need to trust their leaders enough to share and receive.

The road to being understood is paved with misunderstandings. But with patience, anyone can overcome it.  


Background: Over the course of the last 8 months, we’ve surveyed over 400 managers. These are some of the questions they posed to us in an intimate setting.

The above capture a few hypothetical responses leaders should be able to share with their employees and peers. Unfortunately, most of the leaders we've surveyed stated they cannot be honest because of their fear of being disciplined or misunderstood.

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